A few reasons why Emilio Pucci’s “Scarfie” is not likely to replace Instagram

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When I read on the Internet about Scarfie Emilio Pucci app, I thought: what a great idea! To use Internet trends on selfies and then engage the clients of the e-commerce and broaden the knowledge about trends.It is also a great idea due to an opportunity to increase the sales of the accessories. After all, apart from perfumes, they generate the biggest income for luxurious fashion brands.

Then I downloaded the application and got sad. I expected a cool application which puts the filter in the colours of neckerchiefs or which is a different creative adaptation of the newest trends set by Pucci. What a disappointment. The app allows you to virtually try the neckerchief on. By the means of ‘drag and drop’ you can ‘wear’ it.

However, it is not the only reason why I don’t like this application:

  • User Experience – UX –  is, to say the least, not very well-thought. You need to take billion steps to take a photo and try on the neckerchiefs. Secondly, it took me ten-odd seconds to understand what each step was even all about. Thirdly, unfortunately, once I have chosen a neckerchief and taken a photo, I cannot change my choice.
  • Social Icons- look very bad. Moreover, the application has not detected my Twitter account.
  • Share with Pucci – but why would I do it? Is it some kind of competition? Is that some sort of Pucci’s social media? If anyone knows, it is definitely not me (maybe PR people from Pucci?).

Scarfie Social Icons

Ok, but to be objective – I must admit that the application is a cool PR action and campaign idea for Pucci. The information concerning it is to be found, for example, on instyle.com. If there wasn’t such an app, I would not know, as a plain consumer of fashion, what kind of neckerchiefs are currently recommended by Pucci fashion house.. And actually, I really like it!

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